Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Method for simulating creativity to generate sound collages from documents on the web
by Merz, Evan X., D.M.A., University of California, Santa Cruz, 2013, 90; 3609658
Abstract (Summary)

To create algorithmic art with documents available on the internet, artists must discover strategies for organizing those documents. In this project I used a graph structure based on Melissa Schilling's model of cognitive insight to reorganize sounds on the web using aural and lexical relationships. I was then able to generate music with these graphs using several different activation strategies. In section one I introduce my goals for this project. In section two I review other approaches to this problem and art that has influenced my approach. In section three I demonstrate techniques for organizing and collaging sounds from freesound.org. Sounds can be organized in a graph structure by exploiting aural similarity relationships provided by freesound.org, and lexical relationships provided by wordnik.com. Music can then be generated from these graphs in a variety of ways. In section four I show how my software was inspired by theories of creativity. Specifically I show how my software is an illustration of Melissa Schilling's graph model of cognitive insight. In section five, I elaborate on the pieces I've generated for this dissertation using this software and several other novel sound generating programs.

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Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Polansky, Larry
Commitee: Carson, Benjamin, Elsea, Peter
School: University of California, Santa Cruz
Department: Music Composition
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 75/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Music, Artificial intelligence, Computer science
Keywords: Artificial creativity, Creativity, Graph model, Sound art, Sound collage, Web
Publication Number: 3609658
ISBN: 9781303687334
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