Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Leaders' Influence on the Success of Computer Support Teams: A Correlational Study
by Mantsch, Mary E., D.M., University of Phoenix, 2012, 164; 3578027
Abstract (Summary)

Computers have changed the way organizations do business and store information. Teams of professionals are needed to support the increased use of technology. Organizational leaders depend on information technology to obtain market information, maintain contact with customers, maintain organizational data, and stay competitive. Research supports organizational use of teams and a leader’s relationship with followers affect the success of teams, which in turn influences an organization’s competitiveness and outcomes. This quantitative descriptive correlational study describes how leadership and communication styles affect the success of computer support teams. The sample size in the study was relatively small. The response of leaders was eight out of 10 and follower response was 25 out of ninety. The study included a review of the impact of the increased use of teams in organizations and the relationship between leaders and followers. The results indicate a correlation of a leader’s leadership and communication style to the success of computer support team members. The effect of relationships between leaders and followers is important in determining why some computer support teams are less successful.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Gavin, Diane
Commitee: Barclay, Kathleen, Masullo, Miriam
School: University of Phoenix
Department: Management
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 75/04(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Management, Information Technology
Keywords: Competitiveness and outcomes, Computer support teams, Maintaining organizational data, Market information, Organizational leaders, Team dynamics and leadership
Publication Number: 3578027
ISBN: 978-1-303-68175-2
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