Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

How frequency of change within organizations affects burnout of human resource professionals
by Pappenfus, Barbara J., Ph.D., Capella University, 2013, 131; 3608629
Abstract (Summary)

Businesses are faced with many challenges in the global economy which require frequent changes to their organizational structure and business processes. One of the roles of the human resources (HR) department in any business is to act as the strategic partner for management in disseminating changes to the broader employee base. The HR professional who is faced with communicating and implementing these changes may encounter stressful situations as they are executing these new change processes. When stress is not treated it can lead to burnout. The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate if there was a relationship between frequency of change in organizations and burnout among HR professionals. The study also sought to explore the relationship between burnout and gender as well as the relationship between and burnout and position within the organization. The sample included 147 HR professionals who completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), which measured burnout and the Frequency of Change Scale (FoCS) which measured change. The results indicated that the frequency of change in an organization does not have a significant effect on burnout among HR professionals. No relationships were found between burnout and gender or burnout and position. Additional research is needed in this area and recommendations are suggested.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Strickland, Cyd
Commitee: Bann, Cheryl, Ellis, Jerry
School: Capella University
Department: School of Business and Technology
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 75/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Management, Organization Theory
Keywords: Burnout, Human resources, Organizational change
Publication Number: 3608629
ISBN: 9781303669804
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