Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Revolutionary Mexico: Women and the Emergence of Popular Politics
by Guzman Lopez Aguado, Nalei Adriana, Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, 2014, 233; 3606975
Abstract (Summary)

The Mexican Revolution of 1910-1920, was a call to action resulting in the overthrow of Porfirio Díaz and his regime. The significance of this rupture lies in the awakening produced; the revolution prompted a consciousness of the fundamental equality that belongs to all people. Through the dissertation I delve into varying discourses manufactured in post-revolutionary periods addressing nationalism, indigenismo, and corporality. I specifically develop my analysis through the material representations of Frida Kahlo, Tina Modotti, Sergei Eisenstein, and Emilio Fernández. Each of these artists through paintings, photography, or film addresses Mexico's representation of minorities, especially women, in efforts to account for those previously unaccounted. The bodies of minorities as well as symbols and icons are materially depicted, in order to reveal the tension and conflict surrounding order, which culminates in the retention and contestation of power. Curiously, what is uncovered through a discussion of these artists and their work, is that broad categorizations attempting to account for all, reinforce stratification, whereas the discourses that embrace difference are the most proximate to equality.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Legras, Horacio
Commitee: Johnson, Adriana, Mahieux, Viviane
School: University of California, Irvine
Department: Spanish - Ph.D.
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 75/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Latin American Studies, Gender studies
Keywords: Mexican film, Mexican revolution, Women in politics
Publication Number: 3606975
ISBN: 9781303643316
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest