Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

English Language Learners' Educational Attainment in High School: An Examination of Educational Expectation, Academic Self-Efficacy, Parental Expectation and Parental Involvement Using Path Analysis and Structural Equation Modeling
by Shi, Qi, Ph.D., The George Washington University, 2014, 172; 3606964
Abstract (Summary)

The goal of this study was to examine how educational expectation, academic self-efficacy of Math and English, parental expectation, and parental involvement affect ELL students' educational attainment. Given the large and growing percentage of the ELL population in U.S. schools, the status of ELL students' educational attainment is cause for concern. Research on educational attainment for this specific population is scarce; let alone the investigation of predictors of ELL students' educational attainment.

This study used a nationally representative sample from Educational Longitudinal Study: 2002/2006. Path analysis and structural equation modeling were used to test four models depicting the relation between educational expectation, academic self-efficacy of Math and English, parental expectation, parental involvement and ELL students' high school completion and postsecondary institution enrollment. The results showed that all four models fit the data very well. Statistically significant direct effects were found from students' educational expectation at time 2 to high school graduation and also postsecondary institution enrollment. Statistically significant indirect effects were found from students' educational expectation at time 1 to high school graduation and also postsecondary institution enrollment. Both the measurement and structural models of Model 3 and Model 4 fit the data well. Statistically significant direct effects were found from parental expectation and parental involvement at time 1 to high school graduation and postsecondary institution enrollment. Comparison analysis was conducted between Asian-language speakers and Spanish speakers. Model 1& 2 fit Asian-language speakers well but not for Spanish speakers. Model 3 and 4 fit both Spanish speakers and Asian-language speakers, but the models explained more variances in the outcome variables for Spanish speakers. The findings of this study had implications for educational policies targeting ELL students. Limitations and future research recommendations were discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Steen, Sam
Commitee: Dedmond, Rebecca, Garcia, Jorge, Gomez, Joel, Ross-Kidder, Kathleen E., Weiss, Brandi A.
School: The George Washington University
Department: Counseling
School Location: United States -- District of Columbia
Source: DAI-A 75/04(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: English as a Second Language, Counseling Psychology
Keywords: Academic self-efficacy, Educational attainment, Educational expectation, Ell students, Parental expectation, Parental involvement
Publication Number: 3606964
ISBN: 978-1-303-64318-7
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