Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A spatial analysis and zooarchaeological interpretation of archaeological bison remains in the Southwest and the wildlife management implications for the House Rock Valley bison herd in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
by Huffer, Donelle Joy, M.A., The University of Arizona, 2013, 135; 1550169
Abstract (Summary)

The historically introduced House Rock Valley bison herd has, in recent years, migrated from the eastern Arizona Strip onto the Kaibab Plateau within Grand Canyon National Park. Bison are considered a nonnative species to the southern Colorado Plateau, and the animals adversely impact sensitive ecosystems prompting National Park Service wildlife managers to pursue their removal. Archaeofaunal evidence of bison in the Grand Canyon and neighboring regions, however, raises concern that bison may in fact be native. Assessing the evidence within a zooarchaeological interpretive framework is critical since mere presence/absence lists of bison remains do not address the potentially complex cultural processes involved in the formation of archaeofaunal assemblages. Inter-assemblage comparisons illustrate a decline in relative abundance and skeletal completeness correlated to distance from traditionally understood historical bison distribution. If bison were present in the Southwest, as the evidence suggests, they likely entered the region only occasionally as small, dispersed herds.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Pavao-Zuckerman, Barnet
Commitee: Koprowski, John, Stiner, Mary
School: The University of Arizona
Department: Anthropology
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: MAI 52/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Wildlife Management, Archaeology
Keywords: Applied zooarchaeology, Arizona, Bison, Colorado Plateau, Grand Canyon National Park, Invasive species, Wildlife management
Publication Number: 1550169
ISBN: 978-1-303-64220-3
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