Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An exploration of historically black colleges and universities' initiative to develop and implement comprehensive emergency management planning
by Brown, Michael Anothony, Ph.D., Capella University, 2013, 185; 3603810
Abstract (Summary)

Historically, Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) need a systematic planning process for coping with, responding to, preparing for, mitigating, and recovering from disasters. The increase in disasters makes the need for comprehensive emergency management at HBCUs paramount. The problem is that there is no evidence that a systematic planning process is being engaged by HBCUs in an effort to address disasters. The purpose of this case study was to explore the planning process used to develop and implement comprehensive emergency management, which provides a systematic process for dealing with disasters. Information that was collected revealed 7 themes relevant to this case study. Four of the 7 themes were predetermined--(a) get organized, (b) identify hazards, (c) develop a plan, and (d) implement the plan--and three additional themes emerged during in-depth analysis: (e) leadership commitment, (f) skill and knowledge, and (g) cooperation and collaboration. Recommendations for action, further studies, and future research concerns were provided from the results of this study that will be important to policy makers, practitioners, and the sustainability of HBCUs in the future.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Mitchell-White, Kathleen
Commitee: Larson, Dean, Mire, Scott
School: Capella University
Department: School of Public Service Leadership
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 75/03(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Black studies, Higher Education Administration, Higher education
Keywords: Clery act, Disaster preparedness, Emergency management, Historically black colleges, Homeland security, Institutions of higher education
Publication Number: 3603810
ISBN: 9781303586736
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