Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Reaching information society targets: Do national culture attitudes about ict acceptance and use matter?
by Hannan, Daniel D., Ph.D., Capella University, 2013, 377; 3601960
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of the study was to address a gap in the scholarly literature about one of the factors related to the Global Digital Divide by expanding the body of generalizable knowledge about the relationship between national culture attitudes about information and communications technology (ICT) acceptance and use (A&U) and national ICT use behavior across time. A quantitative quasi-experimental non-equivalent groups design was used as the basis for this research. Bivariate correlation analysis was conducted for 64 combinations of use behaviors and attitudes that were drawn from two secondary data sources; the first source was the World Values Survey database, and the second source the International Telecommunications Union ICT database. The study findings consistently suggest that there is a significant relationship between national culture attitudes about ICT A&U and national ICT use behavior across time and within specific periods. Furthermore, the findings suggest that at any point in time, where national culture attitudes about ICT A&U are the strongest, national ICT use behaviors will be the lowest, and where national culture attitudes about ICT A&U are the most neutral, national ICT use behaviors will be the highest.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Vucetic, Jelena
Commitee: Born, Apiwan, Butler, Clifford
School: Capella University
Department: School of Business and Technology
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-B 75/03(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Cultural anthropology, Information Technology
Keywords: Global digital divide, Ict acceptance and use, Ict use behavior, Information and communications technology, Innovation diffusion, National culture
Publication Number: 3601960
ISBN: 9781303537240