Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A mixed methods study exploring the relationship between servant leadership and emotional intelligence
by Roark, Carolyn S., Ed.D., Indiana Wesleyan University, 2013, 271; 3601509
Abstract (Summary)

This mixed methods study based on a cross-sectional design examined the relationship between servant leadership (SL) and emotional intelligence (EI) in leaders in 2 US servant led organizations. Current research suggests an empirical link may exist between servant leadership and emotional intelligence (Parolini, 2005; van Staden, 2007; Vidic, 2008; Waddell, 2009). Greenleaf (1973) described the servant leader as one who is servant first. This character-focused model centers on collaboration and serving followers. Emotional intelligence, which includes self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill, distinguishes effective leaders (Goleman, 2004). In 2012, 42 leaders and 298 followers completed the Servant Leadership Scale (SLS) (Liden, Wayne, Zhao, & Henderson, 2008), the Emotional and Social Competency Inventory (ESCI; Hay Group, 2011), and a demographic questionnaire. Leaders self-rated themselves on the SLS and the ESCI. To avoid same source bias, followers rated their leaders on either the SLS or the ESCI. Correlation analyses were conducted on the overall SL and EI scores. A moderate, but significant, positive correlation was found between SL and EI in the leaders in these organizations. A moderate, but significant, positive correlation was found between the leaders' SL scores and the followers' SL scores. A very weak correlation that was not significant was discovered when comparing the leaders' EI ratings to the followers' EI ratings. The EI score was found to be a significant predictor of the SL score explaining approximately 18% of the variability of the SL score. No significant difference was found among the levels of management relating to the SL scores or the EI scores. A moderate, but significant, positive correlation was found between SL: Putting Subordinates First and EI: Relationship Management. Several SL dimensions and EI competencies were highlighted as strong contributors to the study: (a) SL: Creating Value for the Community, (b) SL: Emotional Healing, and (c) SL: Behaving Ethically (d) EI: Coach and Mentor (e) EI: Emotional Self-Awareness, and (f) EI: Teamwork. Two qualitative interviews complemented these statistical findings. Leaders who appreciate the influence of servant leadership and emotional intelligence in their relationships have the potential to develop high-quality interpersonal relationships with all stakeholders.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Beuthin, Timothy
Commitee: Metzcar, Aaron, Robinette, Betsye
School: Indiana Wesleyan University
Department: Organizational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Indiana
Source: DAI-A 75/02(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Management, Personality psychology
Keywords: Emotional intelligence, Servant leadership scale, Social competency inventory
Publication Number: 3601509
ISBN: 978-1-303-52814-9
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest