Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

A mixed methods study investigating parental involvement and student success in high school online education
by Curtis, Heidi, Ed.D., Northwest Nazarene University, 2013, 159; 3599425
Abstract (Summary)

While questions exist about the effectiveness of online education, it is a growing part of the pantheon of educational choices available to students in America today. Though online education first gained popularity for advanced learners, increasingly at-risk populations are enrolling in online learning environments. Research in K-12 full-time, online learning environments is nearly non-existent. This mixed-methods study investigates student achievement in the full-time, online learning environment and the effect parents have on student success. Descriptive statistics and Pearson's Correlation's found statistically significant relationships between the variables of grade point average and socioeconomic status, family configuration, education of the parent, student grade level, gender and previous online experience. Themes from semi-structured interviews found parents of current or former students in a full-time, online school perceive multiple facets of student success in the online environment. The school can provide support to families by communicating, being transparent with tools, and individualizing instruction. Students must be self-motivated, engaged and participating, and accountable for their own learning. Parents should be available to monitor, mentor, and motivate students.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Werth, Loredada
Commitee: Kellerer, Eric, Lineman, Jeffrey P.
School: Northwest Nazarene University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- Idaho
Source: DAI-A 75/02(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational leadership, Educational technology
Keywords: K-12 education, Online education, Parental involvement, Student success
Publication Number: 3599425
ISBN: 9781303486906
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest