Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Analysis of reporting of violence by intimate partners in the Emergency Department by race/ethnicity, gender and insurance status
by Gameff, Elaine, M.H.A., California State University, Long Beach, 2013, 34; 1524197
Abstract (Summary)

Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a significant concern in the United States with 4.8 million incidents resulting in 500,000 visits to the Emergency Department (ED). Studies have shown that IPV exists among all races and genders and has long-lasting health issues. The purpose of this study was to identify the differences among race/ethnicity, gender, and insurance status in reporting of IPV during an ED visit. During the collection of the data, it was discovered that the information on IPV collected by the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) is considered confidential and not easily accessible. As a result, the study was modified to identify the differences among race/ethnicity, gender, and insurance status in visits to the ED. The hypothesis that there are no differences between males and females was supported. The hypothesis that there are no differences among race/ethnicity and insurance status were both rejected. Recommendations for further research are discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Acosta-Deprez, Veronica
Commitee: O'Lawrence, Henry, Sinay, Tony
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Health Care Administration
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 52/03M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Mental health, Individual & family studies, Health care management
Keywords: Emergency Room, Insurance status, Intimate Partner Violence, Race and gender
Publication Number: 1524197
ISBN: 9781303521744
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