Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Exploring strengths of career technical education deans: Implementing change within community colleges
by Davis, Maria, Ed.D., California State University, Fullerton, 2013, 152; 3574078
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how career technical education (CTE) deans implement crucial changes in their programs to keep up with industry standards required by external agencies, the Perkins grant, and the advancements of technology. Deans must make top-down, lateral, as well as vertical change to implement improvements successfully, and to implement or to create new policies. The participants discussed the unique nature and background associated with CTE and their perceptions of the distinct skill sets that may be unique to leading career education programs.

Little research exists exploring this phenomena and this study could prove invaluable to the CTE field in recruiting, training, and developing current and future CTE Deans. The findings of this study suggest that in order to meet their goals in implementing program changes, CTE deans need to be skilled in the use of referent power, relationship-building, and a participative leadership style. In addition, skilled practitioners must have strong relational skills that emphasize collaboration, persuasion, and determination to lead change successfully. These findings can assist human resource departments in the hiring of effective deans of CTE divisions.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hunter, Jerome
Commitee:
School: California State University, Fullerton
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 74/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Community college education, Higher Education Administration, Vocational education
Keywords: Career and technical education, Change implementation, Deans
Publication Number: 3574078
ISBN: 978-1-303-47318-0
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