Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Kindergarten teachers' perceptions of students' readiness skills
by Soltero-Ruiz, Erlinda E., Ed.D., California State University, Fullerton, 2013, 118; 3574081
Abstract (Summary)

Children need to be ready to enter kindergarten, or they may begin to fall further and further behind. The achievement gap may start prior to children entering kindergarten due to their lack of early learning opportunities. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of kindergarten teachers regarding which readiness skills preschool children should master prior to entering kindergarten in order to be successful.

A literature review supports the variance in perceptions kindergarten teachers have in relation to readiness skills. The conceptual framework starts with a brief history of preschool programs. Following is a discussion regarding the benefits of preschool programs. Next is an overview of the rigor of kindergarten and the transition between preschool and kindergarten. Finally, what readiness skills children need in order to be successful in kindergarten will be reviewed.

This quantitative study surveyed 30 kindergarten teachers in a suburban school district with nine elementary schools. From these surveys, data were collected on kindergarten teachers' perceptions of the readiness skills needed. The results indicated that kindergarten teachers endorsed social-emotional skills as very important skills that should be taught prior to entering kindergarten. Directions for future research or implications for practice are discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Oliver, Ron
Commitee:
School: California State University, Fullerton
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 74/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Early childhood education, Teacher education, Higher education
Keywords: Kindergarten, Readiness skills, Student readiness, Teacher perceptions
Publication Number: 3574081
ISBN: 9781303473210
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