Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Teacher collaboration in the age of teaching standards: The study of a small, suburban school district
by Bronstein, Adam Samuel, Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania, 2013, 234; 3592251
Abstract (Summary)

In the wake of new teaching standards and evaluation systems introduced in the United States, teacher collaboration has emerged as a common theme. However, despite these recent changes, teaching is still largely a private act, in which teachers are often secluded from their colleagues. This study investigated the range and variation of the characteristics of teacher collaboration and their impact in a small, suburban school district in Westchester County, NY. These data were initially gathered through a survey and later through interviews and focus groups. The results were analyzed through a mixed methods lens, using both quantitative and qualitative approaches. This study found that district teachers have some of the structural and many of the interpersonal characteristics favorable to collaboration, the impact of which has led to a strong sense of efficacy and some instructional change. In terms of teacher groups, there was a positive association between the structural and interpersonal characteristics of teacher collaboration and a positive correlation between teacher collaboration and its impact on sense of efficacy and instructional change. It was concluded that the District should enhance the structural characteristics favorable to teacher collaboration in order to impact further instructional change.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Ravitch, Sharon M.
Commitee: O'Connell Rust, Frances, Waff, Diane R.
School: University of Pennsylvania
Department: Educational and Organizational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Pennsylvania
Source: DAI-A 74/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: School administration, Teacher education
Keywords: Characteristics, Collaboration, Impact, Micropolitics, Standards, Suburban, Teacher
Publication Number: 3592251
ISBN: 978-1-303-33239-5
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