Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Effect of Instant Messaging on Lecture Retention
by McVaugh, Nathan Kant, Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin, 2012, 150; 3572872
Abstract (Summary)

The impact of instant message interruptions via computer on immediate lecture retention for college students was examined. While watching a 24–minute video of a classroom lecture, students received various numbers of related–to–lecture (“Is consistent use of the eye contact method necessary for success?”) versus not–related–to lecture (“Have you ever missed class because you couldn't find parking?”) instant messages in addition to note taking vs. no note taking. Student self–rating for multitasking ability, typical and maximum instant messaging activity, and classroom computer use were also measured. Contrary to cognitive models of information processing that suggest instant messages will disrupt student retention of lecture information, no effects were found for number of interruptions, presence or absence of notes, or relatedness of interruption on lecture retention. Students’ multitasking self–rating was negatively related to lecture retention. The implications of these results for classroom practice and future research are explored.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Robinson, Daniel H.
Commitee: Patall, Erika A., Schallert, Diane L., Svinicki, Marilla D., Veletsianos, Georghios
School: The University of Texas at Austin
Department: Educational Psychology
School Location: United States -- Texas
Source: DAI-A 74/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational psychology, Educational technology, Higher education
Keywords: Classroom technology, Instant messaging, Laptop computer, Lecture recall, Multitasking
Publication Number: 3572872
ISBN: 978-1-303-41032-1
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