Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Fire Ground Decision-Making: Transferring Virtual Knowledge to the Physical Environment
by Gillespie, Steven, Ed.D., Grand Canyon University, 2013, 158; 3590526
Abstract (Summary)

The primary purpose of this quantitative study was to examine if simulation training correlated with the decision-making abilities of firefighters from two departments (one in a mountain state and one in a southwest state). The other purposes were to determine if firefighter demographics were correlated with the completion of the simulation training and/or predicted decision-making abilities. The independent variables of this study were the completion simulation-training program and selected firefighter demographics with the naturalistic decision-making abilities of these firefighters as the dependent variable. Using purposive sampling, the participants selected were members of the two sample fire departments. The survey contained three categories: demographic information, simulation-based training program overview, and simulation-training assessment. The study produced some statistically significant findings which provided empirical evidence regarding the effective use of simulation training to the decision-making ability of firefighters. It also addresses the void in the existing knowledge base on the effectiveness in using simulation training on the decision-making ability on the fire ground, which firefighters need particularly.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Ling, Yin, Gasaway, Richard
Commitee: Olson, Jackie
School: Grand Canyon University
Department: Doctoral Studies
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 74/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Behavioral psychology, Management, Educational technology
Keywords: Firefighting, Naturalisitic decision-making, Simulation, Training, Virtual knowledge
Publication Number: 3590526
ISBN: 9781303302923
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