Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Does student perception of quality matter? A study of perceived academic quality and intention to persist
by Heffner, Christopher L., Ph.D., Capella University, 2013, 155; 3590337
Abstract (Summary)

Based on current research and seminal theories on learning, quality, and academic persistence, this study sought to establish the core components of academic quality in higher education and to determine if these components can be used to predict students' intention to persist. This study also looked at differences between traditionally aged college students and their non-traditional adult learner counterparts. Results were significant for all questions asked, suggesting that academic quality can be used as a predictor of students' intention to persist. Additionally, the study found that adult learners rated both the academic quality of their programs and their intention to persist significantly higher than traditional students. Recommendations for further study include research aimed at better understanding persistence estimation and the specific academic quality and persistence relationships that exist in individual programs.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: House, Garvey
Commitee: Benson, Ronald G., Lessner, Janet
School: Capella University
Department: Business and Technology
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 74/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Higher Education Administration, Organizational behavior, Higher education
Keywords: Academic quality, Adult learner, College student, Higher education, Nontraditional student, Student persistence
Publication Number: 3590337
ISBN: 9781303298707
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