Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Understanding Caregivers Perceptions of Malnutrition in the Jinja District of Uganda
by Kamara, Kimberly, M.P.H., Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 2013, 32; 1534946
Abstract (Summary)

Background: In 2006, 16.4% of children under 5 years were reported to be underweight in Uganda. In spite of this high prevalence, only 3.3% of children taken to the Allan Stone Community Clinic, in 2012, were treated for malnutrition. In order to decrease malnutrition in the community, it is imperative to understand caregiver's comprehension of the illness.

Objective: Determine the level of understanding of malnutrition among caregivers in the sub-counties served by the Allan Stone Clinic.

Methods: Qualitative focus group study with female and male caregivers.

Key Results: All focus group participants identified visible signs of malnutrition. Causes cited included feeding practices, sleeping conditions, child care, hygiene, and birth spacing. The major obstacles to prevention and lack of treatment included economic incapacity and lack of knowledge.

Conclusions: A mobile educational campaign focused on using foods locally available could reduce the number of malnourished children in the community.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Hennig, Nils
Commitee:
School: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Department: Public Health
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: MAI 51/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Nutrition, Sub Saharan Africa Studies
Keywords: Malnutrition, Qualitative research, Uganda
Publication Number: 1534946
ISBN: 978-1-267-97651-2
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