Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Male Chinese Student Transitions to Life in an American Secondary Catholic Boarding School
by Mallon, Matthew R., Ed.D., Loyola Marymount University, 2013, 168; 3588512
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the perceived experience of Chinese students during their first year attending a Catholic co-educational boarding and day school in the United States. Data collection included semi-structured interviews of five current students, a faculty and staff questionnaire, and an analysis of the schedule of events for the new boarding student orientation. The data was analyzed using the inductive method for data analysis. The data showed that Chinese students face challenges in four key areas: 1) academic adjustment; 2) social adjustment; 3) emotional support; and 4) developing autonomy. Differences between Chinese culture and American culture provide challenges across the four key areas, leading culture to be best suited as a lens for analyzing the challenges faced by Chinese students transitioning to life at an American boarding school. There should be continuing research to identify the challenges faced by other ethnic and cultural groups in adjusting to life at boarding schools.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Stoddard, Elizabeth
Commitee: Reilly, Elizabeth, Sabatino, Anthony
School: Loyola Marymount University
Department: Education
School Location: United States -- California
Source: DAI-A 74/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: English as a Second Language, Multicultural Education, Religious education
Keywords: Boarding schools, Catholic schools, Chinese students, Secondary education
Publication Number: 3588512
ISBN: 9781303266669
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