Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Administrator and Faculty Perceptions of Incivility and Conflict in the Workplace: A Higher Education Study
by Kendig, Stacey McLeran, Ed.D., West Virginia University, 2013, 106; 3571649
Abstract (Summary)

Uncivil workplace behavior in the higher education environment is counterproductive for achieving institutional goals. Prevailing uncivil behaviors frequently result in unresolved conflict, a focus of various researchers since the mid 1970’s (Andersson & Pearson, 1999; Martin & Hine, 2005; Pierre & Peppers, 1976; Pietersen, 2005; and Twale & DeLuca, 2008). This study was designed to examine administrator and faculty members’ perceptions of uncivil workplace behaviors and organizational culture. The study further examined the relationship between incivility and organizational culture. The Uncivil Workplace Behavior Questionnaire (Martin & Hine, 2005) and the K & C Organizational Culture Instrument (Kendig & Chapman, 2012) were combined and distributed to a small sample of administrators and faculty members in higher education. The respondents included 34 administrators and 151 faculty members from three similar Public 4-Year Institutions of Higher Education (Carnegie Classification, 2010). Results indicate that perceptions of incivility and organizational culture between administrators and faculty members are not different. This study can serve as a contribution to the professional development efforts of administrators and faculty members in higher education.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Chapman, Paul E.
Commitee:
School: West Virginia University
School Location: United States -- West Virginia
Source: DAI-A 74/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Higher Education Administration, Educational leadership, Labor relations
Keywords: Administrators, Faculty, Higher education, Incivility, Workplace conflict
Publication Number: 3571649
ISBN: 9781303254949
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