Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Examining role models and the psychological well-being of teenagers
by Brown, Kevin C., M.S.W., California State University, Long Beach, 2013, 59; 1523342
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between role modeling and psychological well-being among teenagers. Secondary data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) was used to develop a quantitative study on related variables. Findings indicate that there is a significant relationship between role model type and psychological well-being. Specifically, teens with athletes as role models were less likely to report feeling hopeless, restless, depressed and worthless when compared to teens with other types of role models or those with no role model at all. Teens with friends as role models were more likely to report feeling nervous, depressed and worthless. Relationships were also found between parental marital status and teenager well-being. Teenagers whose parents never married were more likely to report feeling depressed, worthless and that everything is an effort compared to teens whose parents were currently married or those whose parents were divorced or separated. The study can be helpful for those providing services to teenagers and their families.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Santhiveeran, Janaki
Commitee: Lam, Brian, Tan, Phil
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Social Work
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 52/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social work
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1523342
ISBN: 9781303209109
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