Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Developing emerging argumentation: Using disparate forms of evidence to create instructional inroads
by Thielemier, Brian T., M.A., Colorado State University, 2013, 57; 1539716
Abstract (Summary)

Argumentation should be approached as a practice that is woven into the larger instructional practices across the core educational disciplines. With the advent of The Common Core State Standards (CCSS), the ability to analyze and write an argument is now a predominant skill students are required to repeatedly demonstrate. As student achievement is now being used to reflect the larger portion of teacher accountability, it is essential that educators better understand how to make argumentation a disciplinary practice. I suggest that students should first be able to examine, identify, and understand the necessary function of evidence as a primary element of argumentation in order to more effectively construct a meaningful, sustainable argument. Through the categorization and analysis of explicit and implicit evidence, students are able to establish more meaningful claims. While this procedure elicits more student engagement and requires educators to reorient their instructional considerations, it also provides a practical starting point for all stakeholders when dealing with emerging argumentation in the classroom.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Souder, Donna
Commitee: De Witt, Debra, Taylor, Ted
School: Colorado State University
Department: English
School Location: United States -- Colorado
Source: MAI 52/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Language arts, Secondary education, Rhetoric
Keywords: Argument, Argumentation, Claim, Evidence, Rhetoric, Secondary
Publication Number: 1539716
ISBN: 9781303154850
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