Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Effects of repeated administration on intensity scales
by Stothart, Cary R., M.S., The Florida State University, 2013, 59; 1539274
Abstract (Summary)

This study assessed the extent to which multiple administrations of an intensity scale; in this case, the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ), influences participant responding on subsequent administrations of the same scale. The first experiment sought to determine this by using a laboratory task in which one group of participants were asked to watch a number of identical videos depicting a simulated drive from the driver's point of view, and fill out an SSQ and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) between viewings of the videos. Another group of participants were asked to view the videos, but were only asked to fill out the SSQ and CES-D once before the first video and once after the last video. Overall, it was found that multiple administrations of the SSQ and CES-D do not substantially influence subsequent responding on both scales. The second experiment sought to replicate the findings from the first experiment online by using Amazon's Mechanical Turk service. Here, the same pattern of responding to the SSQ was found. Together, these findings suggest that additional administrations of an intensity scale; in this case, the SSQ, do not substantially influence participant responding on subsequent administrations.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Charness, Neil
Commitee: Boot, Walter, Johnson, Frank
School: The Florida State University
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- Florida
Source: MAI 51/06M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social psychology, Quantitative psychology, Cognitive psychology
Keywords: Demand characteristics, Intensity scale, Questionnaire, Reactivity, Repeated administrations, Retest effect
Publication Number: 1539274
ISBN: 9781303142932
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