Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Workplace consciousness: Enabling obesity voices of the workers (VOW)
by Nembhard, Richon M., D.M., University of Phoenix, 2013, 234; 3570375
Abstract (Summary)

Obesity is a serious global issue and it is increasing in prevalence in the United States. The purpose of this interpretive hermeneutic phenomenological study was to gain insight into the nature of the impact of work on obesity through reflecting on the lived experiences of employed adults. The research study used a van Kaam method as modified by Moustakas with in-depth, semi-structured interviews to explore factors surrounding the impact of work on obesity. Fifteen participants from two industries (Home Health Care and Education) were interviewed for the study. It was theorized that obesity was influenced by an inability to balance the demands and influence of the work environment with healthy weight management practices. The study revealed that the workplace does affect obesity because of food choices available within the organization, lack of health discussions, work hour demands, and lack of streamlined work processes that enables break periods. The most influential factors on the participants’ state of obesity were external to the workplace. The study also found that unhealthy habits and external relationships influence people’s state of obesity. Social policy change leaders should consider the person as the epicenter of the obesity issue because unhealthy habits are passed from generation to generation and a lack of both self-control and motivation exacerbates the obesity issue.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Lloyd, Gayla
Commitee: Ballaro, Julie, Devnew, Lynne
School: University of Phoenix
Department: Management
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 74/09(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Business administration, Public health, Organizational behavior
Keywords: Obesity, Organizational culture, Work environments
Publication Number: 3570375
ISBN: 9781303149801
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest