Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Exploring how teachers' personal experiences with childhood bullying influence their response to student bullying
by Lay, Debra J., Ed.D., University of Phoenix, 2010, 127; 3570206
Abstract (Summary)

The results of the study provided a unique perspective of 20 teachers and how their personal childhood bullying experiences influenced their response to student bullying. Teachers who participated in this study acknowledged that they had a heightened awareness of student bullying, felt their positive attitude was due to their Olweus training as well as a sensitivity towards students who are bullied, indicated that they were aware of the negative impact on their self-esteem, and identified the role empathy played in their response to student bullying. The question of self-efficacy in fourteen participants (70 percent) was an alarming emergent theme in teachers’ response to student bullying. Although fifteen participants (75 percent) responded in a proactive way, the participants’ self-confidence in stopping bullying altogether remained an issue. The benefits of responding to bullying, according to the participants, included stopping the cycle so as the student being bullied would not bully others, and these same participants felt that responding to bullying helped to build trust between teachers and students. The results of the study provide a framework of recommendations for educational leaders, policy makers, guidance counselors, school psychologists, and teachers.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Marrapodi, Michael
Commitee: Burnham, T. Lee, Foster, Barry
School: University of Phoenix
Department: Educational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 74/09(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational leadership, Middle School education, School administration
Keywords: Bullying, Childhood bullying, Self-confidence
Publication Number: 3570206
ISBN: 9781303131592
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