Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Students' Use of Self-Regulation Strategies in Fully Online and Blended Courses
by Eberhardt, Edna Lucille, Ed.D., Piedmont College, 2013, 189; 3560406
Abstract (Summary)

This study examined students’ use of self-regulation strategies in fully online and blended courses in a rural high school in northeast Georgia. An examination of self-regulation strategies between and within ethnic groups, gender, students’ grade level, and students enrolled or not enrolled in online or blended courses was conducted. Students (n = 507) and teachers (n = 57) from the high school were provided online learning tasks aimed to advance strategies on self-regulated learning. A modified version of the MSLQ (Pintrich, Smith, Garcia, and McKeachie (1991) was used for the students’ survey. The 19-items modified MSLQ survey was associated with eight factors of self-regulation. The eight factors were goal setting, motivation, task strategies, environment structuring, time management, help-seeking, self-efficacy for computer usage, and self-evaluation. However, based on factor analyses, only three factors emerged from the principal component analysis (PCA). The three factors were task strategies, goal setting, and self-efficacy for computer usage. In the qualitative investigation, teacher questionnaires and teacher interviews were used to generate a rich account of students’ self-regulated strategies, offering insight that helped to identify what self-regulated strategies students need to succeed in online and blended courses.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Moody, Michael
Commitee: Hollandsworth, Randy, Palmour, Julie, Samuelsen, Karen, Smith, Hilton
School: Piedmont College
Department: School of Education
School Location: United States -- Georgia
Source: DAI-A 74/08(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational psychology, Educational technology
Keywords: Blended courses, Online courses, Self-regulation
Publication Number: 3560406
ISBN: 9781303063596
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