Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The extent of female spouse–partner involvement and perceived disease knowledgeability on the management of diabetes mellitus II in Hispanic males
by Mills, Alice Chapman, M.S.N., California State University, Long Beach, 2013, 100; 1522643
Abstract (Summary)

The Hispanic American population has a higher risk for chronic diseases, including diabetes mellitus type II (DMII), hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Many population-specific risk factors are modifiable but distinctly related to culture (e.g., language, diet, healthcare practices, gender roles). Thirty participants recruited at a Los Angeles County hospital clinic completed a survey on partner involvement in care and partner knowledge level that were subsequently compared with participants' laboratory values (glycated hemoglobin and low-density lipoprotein [LDL]) and blood pressure.

Three significant correlations were found: Perceived consistent DMII-appropriate meal consumption was correlated with lower LDL levels; increased appointment attendance was associated with decreased LDL level; and there was a positive correlation between partner involvement and partner appointment attendance. The data supported the need for more research in the areas of partner support and education for improved outcomes of diabetics, especially those with strong cultural views and gender role delineations.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Kumrow, David E.
Commitee: Jadalla, Ahlam, Saint-Victor, Bergerette
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Nursing
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 51/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Nursing
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1522643
ISBN: 978-1-303-02055-1
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