Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Increasing Organizational Commitment by inducing P-O Fit through Organizational Values Awareness training
by Fisher, Catherine O., M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2013, 73; 1522567
Abstract (Summary)

The relationship between Person-Organizational Fit (P-O Fit) and Organizational Commitment has been well established in the organizational literature. However, there is limited research on how to induce P-O Fit at job onset (i.e., during a new hire orientation) to achieve organizational commitment earlier in the employee life cycle. One possibility is to educate newly hired employees on organizational values and culture. Therefore, this study analyzed an organizational archival data set to test the hypothesis that organizations can increase new hires' perceptions of P-O Fit through heightening their awareness of organizational values, thereby increasing employees' perceptions of organizational commitment. The archival data were from a university-based retail organization with established organizational values; the organization typically conducts new employee orientation sessions that include a discussion of the organization's values. Participants (N = 147) were given a pre- and post-test surveys before and after attending the orientation (Time 1 and Time 2). It was hypothesized that there would be an increase in mean scores of the key variables of P-O Fit, Organizational Commitment from Time 1 to Time 2 by inducing new employees' Awareness of Organizational Values. The results showed that mean scores of all three variables significantly increased at Time 2 compared with Time 1, and a mediated regression test found that the relationship of Awareness of Organizational Values and Organizational Commitment was partially mediated by P-O Fit. The implications of these findings were discussed.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Whitney, David J.
Commitee: Nguyen, Hannah-Hanh D., Souza, Karoline
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Psychology
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 51/05M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Occupational psychology, Organization Theory, Organizational behavior
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1522567
ISBN: 9781303019791
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