Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Appreciative Inquiry Of Texas Elementary Classroom Assessment: Action Research For A School-Wide Framework
by Clint, Frank Anthony, Ed.D., University of Phoenix, 2012, 262; 3538841
Abstract (Summary)

This qualitative, action-research study used themes from appreciative interviews of Texas elementary teachers to recommend a framework for a school-wide assessment model for a Texas elementary school. The specific problem was that the Texas accountability system used a yearly measurement that failed to track progress over time and failed to accurately provide elementary classroom teachers with information about student performance in ways to guide instructional decision making. Appreciative interviews of 22 participants were analyzed using open coding and thematic analysis. Findings revealed teachers valued teacher-made assessments, consistency and alignment, multiple assessment measures, multiple assessment formats, student-centered assessment, and data-centered assessment for classroom use. Themes were triangulated with literature and public testimony of Texas teachers. Recommendations were made for educational leaders and global leadership. The research method used in this study was an Appreciative Inquiry generative research approach within a larger continuous improvement change management cycle. This is significant for global leadership as a method for implementing a process of change in an organization.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Menees, Jodi
Commitee: Luna, Blaca Alicia, Romans, Russ
School: University of Phoenix
Department: Educational Leadership
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-A 74/07(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Educational tests & measurements, Educational evaluation, Educational leadership, Elementary education
Keywords: Classroom assessments, Elementary schools, Student performance, Texas
Publication Number: 3538841
ISBN: 9781303018374
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