Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Concurrent and construct validity of three alternative versions of the standard OMNI Cycle Scale of perceived exertion in young adult males
by Panzak, George Louis, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 2012, 193; 3538038
Abstract (Summary)

Purpose: To examine, (a) both the concurrent and construct validity of three Alternative Adult OMNI-Cycle Scale formats that eliminate the zero category as an exercise response and (b) to determine if the alternative formats identify perceptual signal dominance integration.

Methods: Sixteen young adult males performed four load incremented cycle ergometer tests. Concurrent validity was established by correlating RPE from the three alternative scales with corresponding VO2 and HR responses. Construct validity was established by correlating RPE from the three alternative scales with RPE from the original scale. Perceptual signal dominance and signal integration were examined by a within subjects three factor ANOVA. All perceptual and physiological data were measured at 40%, 65%, and 90% VO2peak.

Results: Correlations between RPE (Alt I, II, III) and both VO2 and HR ranged from r = 0.81 to 0.94 (P < 0.001). Correlations between RPE (Alt I, II, III) and RPE (Original Scale) ranged from r = 0.93 to 0.98 (P < 0.001). RPE-Legs were higher (P < 0.05) than RPE-Chest for all three Alternative Scales. RPE-Overall did not differ from the mean of RPE-Legs & RPE-Chest.

Conclusion: Findings supported concurrent and construct validity of the three Alternative Adult OMNI-Cycle Scale formats where the zero category was eliminated or represented a resting state and not an exercise response. Both perceptual signal dominance and integration were supported for all three Alternative Scales.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Robertson, Robert J.
Commitee: Goss, Fredrick L., Nagle, Elizabeth F., Rubinstein, Elaine N.
School: University of Pittsburgh
Department: Health and Physical Activity
School Location: United States -- Pennsylvania
Source: DAI-B 74/07(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Physical education, Kinesiology
Keywords: Exercise response, Perceived exertion, Signal dominance
Publication Number: 3538038
ISBN: 9781267997692
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