Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Effects of attitude, norms, and perceived behavior control on intentions to become a teen father
by Gikiri, Monicah M., D.P.A., Capella University, 2012, 133; 3553915
Abstract (Summary)

The field of teen fatherhood is grossly underdeveloped. This study attempted to identify factors that influence teen fatherhood. This study was based on the hypothesis that teen fatherhood is an intentional behavior. To this end, the current study examined how attitudes, subjective norm beliefs, and perceived behavior control relate to the intentions of teens to become fathers. This correlational study used a quantitative approach. A regression analysis was done to explore this hypothesis. Purposeful samples of volunteers were surveyed for the study. The subjects were asked to answer the questions on the survey retrospectively. This innovative approach attempted to inform this elusive phenomenon—teen fatherhood. The results of this study did not confirm a relationship between intention for teens to be teen fathers and the three constructs of the Theory of Planned Behavior—attitude, subjective norms and perceived behavior control. Furthermore, there was no statistical relationship between teen fatherhood and the three construct of the Theory of Planned Behavior.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Krabill, Paige
Commitee: Mire, Scott, Williams, S. Ardail
School: Capella University
Department: School of Public Service Leadership
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-B 74/06(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Social research, Public health, Developmental psychology, Gender studies
Keywords: Attitude, Intentions, Perceived behavior control, Planned behaviors, Pregnancy, Teen fathers
Publication Number: 3553915
ISBN: 978-1-267-93656-1
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