Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Nitrous oxide emissions of higher fungal mycelium under various wastewater concentrations
by Daniels, Russell James, M.S., State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, 2012, 72; 1534032
Abstract (Summary)

Mycofiltration has been proposed as an ecologically sensitive and economically practical solution for removing nutrients from waters. However, fungal systems are known to contribute to nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. N 2O is currently the dominant ozone depletor and a powerful green house gas. Five fungal species were propagated under various wastewater concentrations and their emissions were sampled three times after inoculation. Only Pleurotus ostreatus consistently showed higher N2O concentrations compared to controls but only during the third sampling. Only Coprinus comatus during the second sampling showed a significant correlation between TAN and N2O. C. comatus may emit N 2O with increased nitrogen availability. This research indicates P. ostreatus and C. comatus may be poor candidates for mycofiltration due to N2O emission potential, though the impact has yet to be determined. Stropharia rugosoannulata, Hypsizygus ulmarius and Trametes versicolor are recommended for future mycofiltration research, especially T. versicolor as it may consume N2O.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Diemont, Stewart A. W.
Commitee: Daley, Douglas J., Horton, Tomas R.
School: State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Department: Environmental & Resources Engineering
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: MAI 51/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Climate Change, Water Resource Management, Environmental engineering
Keywords: Fungi, Mycofiltration, Nitrous oxide, Pleurotus ostreatus, Trametes versicolor, Wastewater
Publication Number: 1534032
ISBN: 978-1-267-92758-3
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest