Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Gendering the Client: How Somatic Psychotherapists Understand Gender and Work with it in Clinical Practice
by Glickman, Gary A., Ph.D., The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, 2013, 196; 3551850
Abstract (Summary)

The present study investigated how somatic psychotherapists understand gender and work with it in clinical practice, in order to address a silence regarding gender in the recent literature of somatic psychology—especially in the last generation since the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, and a new reliance on neuroscience for grounding somatic psychotherapeutic practice. Following grounded theory methodology as articulated primarily by Cathy Charmaz (2006), the researcher interviewed 16 somatic psychotherapists from a wide spectrum of gender assumptions and gender identities. Data coded from the transcripts suggested a cyclical process for participant understanding of gender, alternating between expert and naive positions, and illustrating how bodily experience, linguistic influences, implicit and explicit narrative sources, and codified relationships comprise a process for understanding and exploring gender, gender identities, and gender assumptions in clinical practice and beyond.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Johnson, Rae
Commitee: Downing, Christine, Moon, Lyndsey
School: The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Department: Somatic Psychology
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: DAI-B 74/06(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Counseling Psychology, Clinical psychology, Gender studies
Keywords: Body psychotherapy, Gender, Psychology, Psychotherapy, Sexuality, Somatic psychology
Publication Number: 3551850
ISBN: 9781267899743
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest