Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

New Teacher Induction Programs in Georgia: Common Components and Perceptions
by McDaniel, Andrea Marshall, Ed.D., Piedmont College, 2012, 153; 3549118
Abstract (Summary)

With increasing demands on teachers, retaining new teachers has become more difficult in recent decades. New teacher induction programs appear to increase retention rates significantly among new teachers. Many states, including Georgia, have implemented induction programs to support and retain beginning teachers. In response to the Race to the Top (RT3) initiative, the Georgia Department of Education developed guidelines for new teacher induction programs in RT3 districts, and subsequently throughout the state. The purpose of this study was to ascertain which selected components of the Georgia Department of Education guidelines for new teacher induction were currently in use, and the perceptions of school district representatives about those guidelines. The researcher surveyed a census of Georgia public school superintendents or their representatives and used frequency counts and percentages to report responses. The data showed that most of the new guidelines were implemented in most responding school districts. In addition, the respondents' perceptions of the guidelines were mostly positive. The findings suggest that the responding school districts in Georgia are following or planning to follow best practices of new teacher induction as determined by the Georgia Department of Education.

KEYWORDS: induction program, new teacher, retention, teacher induction.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Moody, Michael
Commitee: Brown, JoAnn, Cook, Russell, Jordan, Joan A.
School: Piedmont College
Department: School of Education
School Location: United States -- Georgia
Source: DAI-A 74/05(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Teacher education
Keywords: New teachers, Teacher induction, Teacher retention
Publication Number: 3549118
ISBN: 9781267853103
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest