Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The prediction of wellness factors on alcohol consumption and behaviors related to alcohol among college students
by Golson, Angela Cole, Ph.D., Mississippi State University, 2012, 135; 3546541
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this dissertation study was to investigate wellness as a predictive variable of alcohol consumption among college students. The Five Factor Wellness Inventory (5F-Wel-A) was used to measure the five second-order factors of wellness (e.g. Essential Self, Creative Self, Physical Self, Social Self, and Coping Self). The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) determined college student alcohol consumption by measuring the frequency of consumption, number of drinks, binge drinking, inability to stop drinking, normal expectations of drinking, morning drinking, guilt, memory loss, injury, and recommendations by others. A multiple regression analysis was used to determine the relationships between these variables. The results indicated that wellness factors can predict alcohol consumption and behaviors related to alcohol. Even though Essential Self second-order factor was the most influential wellness factor, Physical Self, Social Self, and Coping Self also were significant predictors of alcohol consumption and behaviors related to alcohol. The results of the research can be used to support the development of wellness programs, to identify at-risk students, and to implement positive lifestyle interventions.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Watson, Joshua C.
Commitee: Looby, Eugenie L., Wells, Debbie K., Yates, Joyce
School: Mississippi State University
Department: Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Special Education
School Location: United States -- Mississippi
Source: DAI-B 74/04(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Counseling Psychology
Keywords: Alcohol consumption, Audit, College students, Five Factor Wellness Inventory, Wellness
Publication Number: 3546541
ISBN: 9781267802323
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