Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Predicting intentional self-inflicted inidry or poisoning
by Rubey, Theresa, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2012, 54; 1521636
Abstract (Summary)

This study examined factors associated with intentional self-inflicted injury or poisoning in order to shed light on the characteristics of this population of patients. It focused on three research questions that explored differences amongst different age groups, genders, races, insurances status groups, what the relationships between these groups and self-inflicted injury or poisoning are and whether frequent users of the emergency room (ER) are more likely to inflict harm to themselves than infrequent users of the ER. This study was a retrospective study using secondary data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey conducted in 2007. Results of the study showed statistically significant relationships between self-inflicted injury or poisoning and all of the factors studied. It also showed that frequent users ofthe ER were not more likely to present to the ER for self-inflicted injury or poisoning. Results of this study indicate a strong need for further research on this topic as several of the findings conflict with what previous literature has found. However, this study provided valuable insight into the characteristics of patients who may be at risk for self-harming behaviors.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Acosta-Deprez, Veronica
Commitee: Acosta-Deprez, Veronica, Reynolds, Grace, Sinay, Tony
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Health Care Administration
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 51/04M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Health care management
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1521636
ISBN: 9781267790651
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