Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Elementary Theory of Parallelism, Convergence and Divergence applied to two dimensional mathematics and physics graphs
by Brekke, Stewart E., Ph.D., International University for Graduate Studies (St. Kitts and Nevis), 2012, 152; 3534044
Abstract (Summary)

Parallelism is often thought of as "similarity or sameness." The magnitude of parallelism is defined as the distance between two parallel lines, planes or surfaces. The smaller the value of the distance between two parallel lines, the greater the magnitude of parallelism, coincidence or sameness. The degree of parallelism is defined as the reciprocal of the magnitude of parallelism in decimal notation. Therefore, the greater the degree of parallelism, the greater the similarity or sameness. The convergence or divergence of two lines at a point can be quantified by the angle in degrees between the two lines. The Law of Convergence states that the smaller the angle of convergence, the greater the convergence between two lines. The Law of Divergence states the greater the angle of divergence, the greater the divergence between two lines. The Elementary Theory of Parallelism, Convergence and Divergence is applied to two dimensional graph examples in mathematics and physics.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Akatsa, Victor
Commitee: Akatsa, Victor, Weisman, Benjamin
School: International University for Graduate Studies (St. Kitts and Nevis)
Department: Arts and Science
School Location: St. Kitts
Source: DAI-B 74/04(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Applied Mathematics, Mathematics, Physics
Keywords: Convergence, Divergence, Parallelism, Physics graphs, Two dimensional mathematics
Publication Number: 3534044
ISBN: 9781267796639
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