Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Wellness Program Variables and Stress: An Extension of the Job Demand-Control Model
by Hutton, H. Patrick, Ph.D., Northcentral University, 2012, 126; 3531496
Abstract (Summary)

The theory of the Job Demand-Control (JDC) model implies a relationship between job demands, job control. and stress; however, research has not confirmed this relationship. Furthermore, previous research has revealed limitations demonstrated by inconsistencies in findings concerning relevant moderating variables for the JDC model. Therefore, the purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to assess the relationship between job demands, job control, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), and stress in approximately 250 male and female State of Oklahoma employees. Stress levels, physical activity, and BM1 were measured using scales located in the Health Risk Appraisal (HRA), and job demands and job control were measured using the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) job characteristic scale. The level of job demands and job control and the overall model were significant (p<.001, R2 </super>=.142) in relation to stress. Reported stress was significantly correlated with job demands (r = .173, p = .006) and job control (r = -.258, p<.001). Additionally, job demands and job control were significant (p<.001), however physical activity was not (p = .538), and the overall model was significant ( p<.001, R2</super> = .154). A nonparametric Mann-Whitney test was used to determine what effect physical activity has on the relationship between job demands and stress and job control and stress, and indicated that there were no significant differences between the groups (U = 7578.00, p = .722). Furthermore, the relationship between job demands, job control, BMI, and stress were all significant (p<.001), and the overall model was significant (p<.001, R 2</super> = .154). Mann-Whitney follow up tests determined that when compared to non-obese employees, obese employees with high job demands and high job control exhibited significantly higher levels of stress (U=887.50, p=.001). Obese employees with high job demands and low job control exhibited significantly higher levels of stress than non-obese people with high job demands and low job control (U=333.500, p<.001). Findings may assist employers in developing and implementing employee stress management programs.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Demeter, Lori
Commitee:
School: Northcentral University
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-B 74/02(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Occupational health, Occupational psychology, Organizational behavior
Keywords: Body mass index (BMI), Industrial and organizational psychology, Job control, Job demands, Physical activity, Stress, Wellness program
Publication Number: 3531496
ISBN: 9781267734372
Copyright © 2019 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
ProQuest