Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An exploratory case study of African American men on the decision making of prostate cancer screening
by Hill, Keran S., D.H.A., University of Phoenix, 2012, 149; 3532744
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of the qualitative case study was to understand the lived experiences and attitudes of African American men and to investigate the social and cultural behaviors, and barriers that prevented them from having prostate cancer screening. A total of 14 African American men from a primary care and adult day healthcare program participated in the study. Purposeful sampling was used to select the participants. The study analysis identified eight themes and one outlier. The themes were (a) lack of education, (b) beliefs, (c) motivations, (d) masculinity, (e) shame, and (f) fear, (g) perception of prostate cancer screening, (h) stigma, and (i) food and diet. Implications were African American men perceived masculinity as being threatened when female healthcare providers were aware of erectile dysfunction, sexual problems, or prostate issues. One of the recommendations was involving more female healthcare providers with prostate cancer survivors to foster an effective and satisfactory dialogue in the African American communities. Offering prostate cancer screening awareness programs in barbershops, pharmacies, bars, methadone clinics, churches, senior citizens centers, and stadiums inspired African American men to seek prostate cancer screening.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Medeiros, Randall
Commitee: Kovacich, Joann, Regester, Maria
School: University of Phoenix
Department: Health Administration
School Location: United States -- Arizona
Source: DAI-B 74/03(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: African American Studies, Black studies, Public health, Cognitive psychology, Oncology
Keywords: African-American, Cancer screening, Decision-making, Men, Prostate cancer
Publication Number: 3532744
ISBN: 9781267761156
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