Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Immediate effects of positive self-talk on stress and speech performance
by Chen, Wei-Ju, M.A., San Jose State University, 2012, 66; 1528865
Abstract (Summary)

Self-talk is a psychological and cognitive product of humans that correlates with stress-related variables, such as anxiety and depression. The immediate effects of positive self-talk on stress (in terms of cortisol reactivity) and speech performance have yet to be investigated. Thus, the author examined the immediate effects of positive self-talk on stress and speech performance. The roles of dispositional and speech-related inner self-talk were also investigated. One hundred and forty participants were assigned to Control, Stress Alone, Positive Self-Talk, or Distraction conditions. A standardized stress-inducing task was used for the experimental groups. Participants in the Positive Self-Talk condition rehearsed a positive self-statement during the experiment, and a distraction task was completed by those in the Distraction condition. Saliva samples were collected for cortisol analysis, and questionnaires were administered to assess participant perceived stress levels and inner self-talk. Immediate effects of positive self-talk on cortisol reactivity, perceived stress, and speech performance were absent. Nevertheless, speech-related positive inner self-talk was inversely correlated with the perceived stress level. Furthermore, negative inner self-talk was also related to cortisol reactivity, perceived stress, and speech performance.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Chancellor-Freeland, Cheryl
Commitee: Hosoda, Megumi, Oyamot, Clifton
School: San Jose State University
Department: Psychology-Experimental
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 51/03M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Communication, Cognitive psychology
Keywords: Cortisol, Self-talk, Speech performance, Stress
Publication Number: 1528865
ISBN: 978-1-267-69279-5
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