Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

An assessment of student nurse practiotioners readiness to manage medication regimes of chronically ill patients
by Umbrino, Joseph R., M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2012, 115; 1520935
Abstract (Summary)

Excellent medication adherence is required for optimal clinical outcomes in treatment of chronic illnesses like HIV I AIDS where patients must achieve adherence levels of > 95% to avoid complication. Readiness has been proven to be a reliable predictor of adherence. Assessing patients' readiness before beginning treatment has increased adherence levels. This study attempted to determine if a correlation existed between the use of a modified version ofthe HIV Medication Readiness Scale (HMRS) and an educational intervention, in improving readiness of student nurse practitioners (SNPs) to manage HIV I AIDS medications. The HMRS is a brief, easy-to-use, clinically relevant tool that can identify people living with HIV at risk of non-adherence who might benefit from readiness counseling prior to initiating treatment. Eleven SNPs (N = 11) completed the HMRS, which demonstrated high internal consistency (alpha = .912) and sensitivity to change following the intervention. Higher readiness scores supported predictive validity after the intervention (alpha = . 93 7), which may predict higher readiness to treat chronically ill patients with complicated medications. This was supported by a correlated t-test yielding a statistically significant p-value of 0.002 ( < .05). Data collected may support the HMRS as a useful tool in accessing SNPs readiness to manage other diseases

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Singh-Carlson, Savitri
Commitee: Cullity, Sharon, Ignat, Sharon
School: California State University, Long Beach
Department: Nursing
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 51/03M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Nursing, Pharmacy sciences, Health care management
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1520935
ISBN: 9781267703323
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