Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The effectiveness of Cane Fu as an intervention for reducing fall risk and fear of falling amongst the elderly
by Riseley, Brian, M.S., California State University, Long Beach, 2012, 73; 1520879
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of practicing ten hours of Cane Fu on fall risk and activity-specific balance confidence scores among individuals aged 55 and over. Eighteen participants were drawn from two locations. A causal-comparative prepost test design was used to compare participants' scores as observed before and after participating in 10 hours of Cane Fu classes. Fall risk was assessed using the Timed-Up-and-Go test and fear of falling was assessed using the Activity-Specific Balance Confidence Scale. Participants' fall risk scores were significantly lower following 10 hours of Cane Fu training. However, there was no significant difference in participants' Activity-Specific Balance Confidence Scores as observed before and after treatment. From this, it can be concluded that Cane Fu is an effective intervention for reducing fall risk among individuals aged 55 and over. These results may have been influenced by unpaired prepost tests.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: White, Barbara
Commitee:
School: California State University, Long Beach
School Location: United States -- California
Source: MAI 51/03M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Gerontology, Aging
Keywords:
Publication Number: 1520879
ISBN: 978-1-267-70276-0
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