Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Politicizing of Science: Implications for Education
by McDonald, Thomas A., M.Ed., State University of New York at Buffalo, 2012, 121; 1520004
Abstract (Summary)

This paper argues that the politicization of science in recent times coincides with a necessary turn toward social epistemology and historicist conceptions of science and rationality. It is shown how history, philosophy, and sociology of science (HPSS) make important contributions to interdisciplinary research in public understanding of science (PUS). However, it is argued (in agreement with Kuhn's finding) that critical HPSS is not a necessary part of traditional, pre-professional science education, but is a necessary part of any general or liberal science education, the latter being needed to foster critical ability among citizens to judge increasingly complex science-related public issues. With a view to informing such an approach, fundamental problems at the intersection of science and society are analyzed, concerning the relationship between science and the state, implications of the new life sciences for politics, and ultimately whether modern science is to remain in contradiction with modern political self-conceptions.

Keywords: cultural authority of science, liberalism, philosophy of science, political science, public understanding of science, science education

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Shook, John
Commitee: Liu, Xiufeng
School: State University of New York at Buffalo
Department: Learning and Instruction
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: MAI 51/03M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Philosophy of Science, Education Policy, Sociology
Keywords: Cultural authority of science, Liberalism, Philosophy of science, Political science, Public understanding of science, Science education
Publication Number: 1520004
ISBN: 9781267672476
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