Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The Influence of Hijab on Perceptions of Attractiveness, Intelligence, and Employability: A Comparative Study of South Asian Muslim Women in the US and the UAE
by Pasha-Zaidi, Nausheen, Ph.D., The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, 2012, 159; 3524456
Abstract (Summary)

This study investigates the influence of the hijab (the Islamic headscarf) on perceptions of attractiveness, intelligence, and employability among South Asian Muslim women in the United States (US) and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The effects of religiosity and perceived discrimination were also examined. Results suggested that the hijab was a salient marker of in-group preferences for hijabis, but the lack of hijab was not necessarily a salient condition to promote in-group preferences for non-hijabis. Religiosity was highly correlated with personal hijab status; however, as a separate variable, religiosity did not have an effect on perceptions of attractiveness or intelligence, except in the UAE where participants who reported higher levels of religiosity rated photos of non-hijabis lower in attractiveness. US participants reported more discrimination than UAE participants. However, perceived discrimination only had a negative effect on ratings of employability among hijabis in the US, not among non-hijabis in the UAE.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Masson, Tiffany
Commitee: Pennington, M. Nan, Wolowitz, Leslie
School: The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Department: International Psychology: Organizations and Systems Concentration
School Location: United States -- Illinois
Source: DAI-B 74/01(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Religion, Social psychology, Islamic Studies
Keywords: Employability, Hijab, Intelligence, Islamic headscarf, Muslim women, Perceived discrimination, Perceptions of attractiveness, South asian women
Publication Number: 3524456
ISBN: 9781267589262
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