Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Design and application of an instrumented pendulum device for measuring energy absorption during fracture insult in large animal joints in vivo
by Diestelmeier, Bryce, M.S., The University of Iowa, 2012, 101; 1518577
Abstract (Summary)

Intraarticular fractures (IAFs) are a leading cause of posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Despite the latest orthopaedic treatment techniques, the risk of PTOA after IAFs has remained unacceptably high. In order to progress in this field, a new mechanical insult technique to create a large animal survival model of human IAF was developed. Current IAF models report the initial gravitational potential energy as the fracture energy value. However, this model included a pendulum device that was instrumented to accurately measure the amount of energy absorbed during fracture insult.

After validating the energy absorption measurement with a mechanical testing machine and motion capture system, an in vivo study was conducted. The range of energy absorption measurements during fracture of the eleven animals was 11.7–31.8 joules, with a mean and standard deviation of 20.8 ± 5.7 joules. On average, the energy absorption measurements were approximately 52 percent of the pre-impact kinetic energy values. These data showed that there was a substantial difference between the energy absorbed during fracture insult and the pre-impact energy, which provided novel information associated with the pathomechanics of the induced injury.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Brown, Thomas D.
Commitee: Grosland, Nicole M., Tochigi, Yuki
School: The University of Iowa
Department: Biomedical Engineering
School Location: United States -- Iowa
Source: MAI 51/02M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Biomedical engineering, Mechanical engineering, Biomechanics
Keywords: Absorption, Animal, Energy, Fracture, Osteoarthritis, Pendulum
Publication Number: 1518577
ISBN: 978-1-267-60861-1
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