Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Water infrastructure challenges in urbanizing environments: A case study of the 2009 Logan Canal landslide
by Henderson, Kathryn Davis, M.S., Utah State University, 2012, 91; 1518505
Abstract (Summary)

Social constructions, or frames, often determine how and to whom benefits and burdens are delivered by public policy. Triggering events often open policy windows in which drastic policy changes can occur. In July of 2009, a wet, steep hillside failed in Logan, Utah, leveling a home below and destroying an irrigation canal that ran along the hill. The resulting policy changes illustrated how social constructions of agricultural producers in terms of deservedness and power shifted, both as a result of urbanization and as a result of the landslide. Policy processes are often path-dependent and decisions can become self-reinforcing. Analyzing the pathway that led up to the landslide provided insights into the importance of proactive management and long-term planning of water infrastructure, especially in urbanizing environments. By using policy and discourse analysis, this thesis highlights water management challenges involved in the urbanizing arid U.S. Intermountain West and how planners and policymakers can use this information to achieve democratic policy solutions.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Endter-Wada, Joanna
Commitee: Ma, Zhao, Runhaar, Josh
School: Utah State University
Department: Environment and Society
School Location: United States -- Utah
Source: MAI 51/02M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Environmental management, Natural Resource Management, Water Resource Management
Keywords: Case study, Infrastructure, Policy, Policy analysis, Process tracing, Water resources
Publication Number: 1518505
ISBN: 978-1-267-60664-8
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