Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

The lived experience of the adult African American female who has lived in multiple foster care placements
by Johnson, Avonda C., Ph.D., Capella University, 2012, 96; 3518439
Abstract (Summary)

The purpose of the study was to examine and describe the lived experiences of the adult African American woman who had lived in multiple foster care placements. Eleven adult African American women ages 22–25 participated in semi-structured, face-to-face interviews to tell their stories and provide data of the memories of the experience. The several coding methods utilized generated eight emergent themes conceptualizing the phenomenon studied: (a) issues in care, (b) a challenging environment, (c) caregivers, (d) mental health concerns, (e) impact of spirituality, (f) effects on my character, (g) support and guidance, and (h) effects on emotions and feelings. Results suggested the presence of the lasting effects of the circumstances and people encountered early in life. Recommendations included access to counselors during the placements, earlier introduction of transitional programs for aging-out girls, and the introduction of sensitivity training for anyone involved in the lives of children living in out-of-home care as a means of reducing the impact of multiple foster care placements.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Cabanilla, Anne S.
Commitee: Page, Thomas L., Young, Rosalyn
School: Capella University
Department: Harold Abel School of Social and Behavioral Sciences
School Location: United States -- Minnesota
Source: DAI-A 73/12(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: African American Studies, Black studies, Social work, Womens studies, School counseling, Public policy
Keywords: African American female, African-American, Caregivers, Foster care, Mental health concerns, Multiple placements, Placement instability
Publication Number: 3518439
ISBN: 9781267498113
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