Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Evaluations of Integrated Pest Management control techniques of the Asian cockroach (Blattella asahinai Mizukubo) in the Urban Environment
by Snoddy, Edward Todd, Ph.D., Auburn University, 2012, 119; 3520458
Abstract (Summary)

The objective of this research was to evaluate components of an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program for the Asian cockroach, Blattella asahinai Mizukubo. IPM programs are more effective in control of cockroaches than insecticides alone. IPM programs are usually the most environmentally friendly because they drastically reduce the amount of pesticide residue.

The toxicity of seven consumer gel and paste insecticide baits was evaluated against Asian cockroaches in continuous exposure tests with and without competitive food. Bait toxicity and consumption varied with the gel and paste bait and with and without a competitive food source. Advion® was the most toxic insecticidal bait, however, and the LT50 value decreased in the presence of competitive food. The toxicity of nine consumer granular insecticide baits was evaluated against Asian cockroaches in continuous exposure tests with and without competitive food. Toxicity and consumption varied among the granular baits and with the presence of competitive food. Most baits had greater LT50 values when the cockroaches were presented competitive food. Performance of β-cyfluthrin EC and fipronil granules and an organic essential oil EC mixture was evaluated against Asian cockroaches in field and laboratory experiments. Results of the field applications and laboratory experiments indicate the best choice for control of the Asian cockroach would be β-cyfluthrin EC and fipronil granules.

Mulch preferences of the Asian cockroach were determined in a series of laboratory experiments. Five mulches were used: cypress, oak leaf litter, pine straw, rubber, and topsoil. In large arena tests, adult males preferred oak leaf litter and pine straw, while adult females preferred oak leaf litter and rubber mulches. All nymphal stages preferred the rubber (48.33 ± 13.08%) over all other mulches. Light preferences of the Asian cockroach were evaluated under urban field conditions. Adults preferred compact fluorescent and incandescent light over the other lights. No adults were observed at red and LED lights, and only one adult was observed at the yellow light. These findings were consistent with other domestic and peridomestic cockroach behavior to lights.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Appel, Arthur G.
Commitee:
School: Auburn University
School Location: United States -- Alabama
Source: DAI-B 73/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Entomology
Keywords: Asian cockroach, Blattella asahinai Mizukubo, Integrated pest management, Pest control, Pesticide residue
Publication Number: 3520458
ISBN: 978-1-267-49714-7
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