Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

In their own words: African American women narrate their experiences to leadership
by Choates, Ramelli, Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo, 2012, 174; 3516385
Abstract (Summary)

This study employs a qualitative approach, using oral narratives to provide the life stories of five African American women administrators in higher education. The purpose of the study is to understand the impact of various influences, sources of support, and impact of mentorship on African American women who obtained senior administrative positions in higher education. Moreover, this body of work examined how the intersections of race and gender shaped the career paths of these women using Patricia Hill-Collins six distinguishing features of Black Feminist Thought (BFT). While each framework of her theory is significant in understanding and describing the multiple oppressions and experiences of Black women in this study, there were only four used to analyze the findings of this study.

The core meaning of Hill-Collin's Theory is the connections between Black women's experiences through resistance and oppression. Overall, the study highlights success of Black women in the academy

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Colyar, Julia
Commitee: Barba, William, Johnson, Lauri
School: State University of New York at Buffalo
Department: Education, Leadership & Policy
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: DAI-A 73/11(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: African American Studies, Black studies, Educational evaluation, Higher Education Administration, Womens studies, Higher education
Keywords: African-American, Black feminists, Black women, Higher education administration, Leadership
Publication Number: 3516385
ISBN: 9781267456816
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