Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Emergence phenology and ecological interactions between the exotic Sirex noctilio, native siricids, and a shared guild of native parasitoids
by Standley, Christopher R., M.S., State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, 2012, 107; 1514410
Abstract (Summary)

Sirex noctilio Fabricius is an exotic wasp utilizing host trees within the genus Pinus. Previous invasions in the southern hemisphere have resulted in devastating economic impacts and established populations were detected in the U.S. and adjoining Canada in 2005. Objectives of this study were to describe the ecology and interactions between S. noctilio, native siricids, and their associated parasitoid guild. Natural emergence phenologies were developed for this complex by rearing 30 infested red and Scots pines from two pine stands in 2010 and 60 pines from seven stands in 2011. Degree-day accumulation to emergence was quantified to assist landowners and managers to combat this insect where it becomes a problem. Parasitism was quantified across all sites to generate a more comprehensive understanding of Sirex-parasitoid interactions at the landscape scale. In 2010, two new associations were documented between S. noctilio and a rhyssine parasitoid, Rhyssa crevieri, and the cleptoparasitoid Pseudorhyssa nigricornis .

Key Words : Sirex edwardsii, Sirex nigricornis, degree-day, competition, percent parasitism, population density.

Indexing (document details)
Advisor: Fierke, Melissa K., Parry, Dylan
Commitee: Allen, Douglas C.
School: State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Department: Environmental & Forest Biology
School Location: United States -- New York
Source: MAI 51/01M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Source Type: DISSERTATION
Subjects: Wildlife Management, Ecology
Keywords: Competition, Degree-day, Percent parasitism, Population density, Sirex edwardsii, Sirex nigricornis
Publication Number: 1514410
ISBN: 9781267458025
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